Tag Archives: rocky fork

2014 Spring Dinner Meeting

When: April 25th
Where: Eastman Lodge
How: Last page of the newsletter

Time to enjoy fellowship as the outdoor season begins…

Our evening program is on “Amazing Places in The Tennessee Blue Ridge” by David Ramsey.  The Appalachian Trail closely follows the North Carolina–Tennessee border along the main Appalachian crest.  Although the wild and scenic qualities of the lands that lie on each side of this boundary are virtually equal, those of the Tennessee region have often been overshadowed by their North Carolina counterparts.  This program will explore the Tennessee Blue Ridge ending with an update about Rocky Fork.

Happy “Trails” Hour begins at 5:30pm.  Dinner will be BBQ from Phil’s Dream Pit for $12 inclusive per adult and $6 for children.  Club awards will be presented.  Door prizes!  Done by 9pm.

For more details, check the club newsletter.

Hike Report: Rocky Fork—Flint Creek Battle Site, Nov 10, 2013

Vic Hasler reporting
On a gorgeous, late fall, Sunday afternoon, one car carrying Steve Ankabrandt, Gerald Scott, Marc Schurger, and Vic Hasler took the 50-minute drive to the trailhead arriving at 2PM. With an early 5:30PM sunset, long shadows were already creeping into the valley. Leaves thickly covered the gravel road which runs along the cascading Rocky Fork stream. Back on wintery January 10, 1789 morning, John Sevier and his men had to walk or ride horses in snow along or in the cold flow – pulling “grasshopper” field cannon with three pound balls/canister shot. A portion of the troops were also sent over Flint Mountain to close the retreat path. Upon reaching Flint Creek, we discovered that a large blowdown across the stream has been converted into a simple bridge, thus affording a quick and dry passage. The Indian encampment site was in the bottomlands where the two creeks merged. Sevier reported determining their exact location from the smoke of their campfires. The wet weather caused the gunpowder to not function, so the battle quickly evolved into hand-to-hand combat with sword and tomahawk. The encounter was no longer than an hour, leaving a “bloody field” per the governor’s report. For the hikers, we could see the regrowth forest in the lowlands, but could only imagine what occurred on that snowy morning. We hiked to the upper end where the Flint Trail continues following the creek up to the ridgeline at the A.T., and then turned back. A nice easy three-mile hike was enjoyed.  Some will be back next year to pursue fishing, and a hike to the top of White House Cliffs as a newly cut trail was observed.